March 1900 Red Ash Mining Disaster (WV)

Red Ash, Rush Run Explosions

Per e-WV:

West Virginia’s first major mine explosion of the 20th century occurred March 6, 1900, at Red Ash Mine on New River in Fayette County. On the night of March 5, a machine operator had left open a ventilating trap door, allowing methane to gather. The next morning, some workers, violating both custom and state law, traveled toward their working faces before the late-arriving fireboss had completed his gas checks. Probably, their open lights set off a methane ignition which instantly brought explosive coal dust into the air, adding to the intensity of the blast. Several kegs of blasting powder ignited as the explosion coursed through the mine, twisting rails, destroying mine cars, and hurling men, mules, and timbers against the ribs.

As usual in coal mine explosions, most of the 46 victims suffocated in the carbon monoxide atmosphere (afterdamp) following the blast, including the fireboss, who had held his vest to his face in a futile effort to filter the afterdamp. Recovery workers reached the last of the victims on March 10, and the mine resumed operation on March 26.

Five years later a second tragedy occurred at the Red Ash Mine, by then connected to the neighboring Rush Run Mine. Rush Run and Red Ash mines maintained, by the standards of the day, excellent ventilation. Yet, fine coal dust created by mining machinery abounded. On the evening of March 18, 1905, only 13 men remained underground in the two mines. In a freak occurrence, a mine car ran over some loose explosives. The resulting concussion and flame suspended and ignited coal dust, causing a massive explosion which coursed through both mines.

Carelessly, a rescue party, some carrying open-flame lights, entered the Red Ash portal. Either burning timbers or the rescuers’ open lights set off another explosion. Although not as powerful as the first, this second explosion on March 19 killed all 11 members of the rescue party underground, shot flame out the drift mouth, and tossed people standing outside several feet down the hillside toward New River. It required ten days to restore ventilation and recover all 24 bodies.

This Article was written by Paul H. Rakes

Last Revised on October 22, 2010

Red Ash Mine Disaster of 1900, New River District of West Virginia -
The Wheeling Daily Intelligencer
Wheeling, West Virginia
07 Mar 1900, Wed  •  Page 1

Per Wiki:

The Red Ash Mine disasters were two deadly mine disasters that occurred at the Red Ash mine in Fire Creek, West Virginia on March 6, 1900, and on March 18, 1905.

The first disaster was a result of a worker accidentally leaving a ventilating trap door open, resulting in a buildup of methane. It is believed that their coal lights ignited the methane and blasting powder kegs, which caused a severe explosion that killed 46 men and boys, most of whom suffocated from carbon monoxide inhalation.

The second disaster resulted from a mine car accidentally running over some loose explosives. This, coupled with a failure to damp the coal dust, resulted in a large explosion that killed 13. The next day, on March 19, 11 rescue workers then entered the area, and a second explosion occurred killing them all

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The Wheeling Daily Intelligencer
Wheeling, West Virginia
07 Mar 1900, Wed  •  Page 4
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The Wheeling Daily Intelligencer
Wheeling, West Virginia
08 Mar 1900, Thu  •  Page 2
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The Wheeling Daily Intelligencer
Wheeling, West Virginia
09 Mar 1900, Fri  •  Page 1
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The Wheeling Daily Intelligencer
Wheeling, West Virginia
10 Mar 1900, Sat  •  Page 1
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The Wheeling Daily Intelligencer
Wheeling, West Virginia
10 Mar 1900, Sat  •  Page 5
Red Ash wheeling daily intelligencer mar 15 1900 coroner -
The Wheeling Daily Intelligencer
Wheeling, West Virginia
15 Mar 1900, Thu  •  Page 1
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The Wheeling Daily Intelligencer
Wheeling, West Virginia
23 Mar 1900, Fri  •  Page 7
14 Aug 1975, Thu, Beckley Post-Herald -
Beckley Post-Herald
Beckley, West Virginia
14 Aug 1975, Thu  •  Page 4

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