Women’s History Month: Army Auxiliary Corps

Link for info below: https://www.army.mil/women/history/wac.html

With war looming, U.S. Rep. Edith Nourse Rogers of Massachusetts introduced a bill for the creation of the Women’s Army Auxiliary Corps in May 1941. Having been a witness to the status of women in World War I, Rogers vowed that if American women served in support of the Army, they would do so with all the rights and benefits afforded to Soldiers.

Fort Des Moines opens as the first WAAC training center in July 1942. Training at Fort Des Moines involved primarily drill and ceremonies, military customs and courtesies, map reading, company administration, supply and mess management. (Photo courtesy of U.S. Army Women's Museum)
Fort Des Moines opens as the first WAAC training center in July 1942. Training at Fort Des Moines involved primarily drill and ceremonies, military customs and courtesies, map reading, company administration, supply and mess management. (Photo from U.S. Army Women’s Museum)

Spurred on by the attack on Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941, Congress approved the creation of WAAC on May 14, 1942. President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed the bill into law on May 15, and on May 16, Oveta Culp Hobby was sworn in as the first director. WAAC was established “for the purpose of making available to the national defense the knowledge, skill, and special training of women of the nation.”

I found this advertisement while searching through archived newspapers:

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The Raleigh Register
Beckley, West Virginia
Fri, Feb 12, 1943 · Page 5

Links For More Reading on the Women of the Army Maxillary Corps

Army History Link “Skirted Soldiers” Can Be Found: HERE

https://www.womensmemorial.org/history/detail/?s=wwiiwomens-army-corps

https://www.armyheritage.org/75-information/soldier-stories/326-wacwwii

http://www.nww2m.com/2012/05/waac-created/

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