Travel: Rt 66 Albuquerque NM

You know, I cannot say Albuquerque without thinking:

While in Albuquerque, we took in two iconic sights:

Kelly’s Brew Pub – Website: http://www.kellysbrewpub.com/ – Located at: 3222 Central Ave SE

Hours of operation: 11AM-10PM Mon-Thr, 11AM-11PM Fri, 8AM-11PM Sat, 8AM-10PM Sun

Cost: Decent – not cheap, not expensive.

This is the site of the old Jones Motor Company, a Rt 66 iconic location.  According to the NPS website: In 1939, Ralph Jones, prominent local businessman and president of the Route 66 Association and the Albuquerque Chamber of Commerce, commissioned the construction of a gas station, a car dealership, and service station along Route 66 in Albuquerque. Architect Tom Danahy designed the one-story building in an Art Moderne style with white stucco, red brick coping, and a flat roof. The intent was to attract travelers with its location, design, and accessibility. The detailed stepped tower with abstract ornamental molding above the central portion of the building was one of the first icons encountered by westbound travelers on Route 66.  Constructed at the eastern end of Albuquerque, the station featured gas pumps at an angle on one side, allowing motorists to easily access the pumps from two sides. Large display windows in front showcased the latest car models to passing travelers on the other side.  Both sides were marked by curved walls.  Years later, the place became so popular that Mr. Jones constructed a canopy on the southern wall of the garage, so that the customers could unload their vehicles in the shade before servicing. Upon its completion, the Jones Motor Company was considered the most modern station in the West.  In 1957, the Jones Motor Company moved out to a new location, and ownership of this building changed hands several times.  Kelly’s Brewery purchased the building in 1999 and restored many of the original design elements, including Texaco pumps and the original garage doors. Today, the building is a popular brewpub and restaurant. It was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1993. 

I found an old photo online of what it used to look like:

(original photo can be found here: https://66theroute.wordpress.com/)

Time allotted for this stop: Because it is now a pub, we decided to grab a bite to eat here for lunch.

My thoughts: It made me a little sad that an iconic landmark is no known well for its origins by the people who work in the new business there.  Especially when there are newspaper clippings on the walls they walk past every day.  My pet peeve.  Bobby ordered a stuffed portable mushroom and fish/fried. I ordered green chili mac n cheese with a side salad and a desert of  creme brulee. Bobby is usually the cookie monster of mushrooms.  He ate a few bites and then never finished it.  I leave that as it’s own critique.  He devoured the fish though. I was not a huge fan of the mac but the balsamic dressing they used for the salad was spot on.  I had never had creme brulee before.  This desert was divine.  I have nothing to compare it to, but that is ok.  My tastebuds did a happy dance.

My pictures from Kelly’s Brew Pub (formerly Jones Motor Co):

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Madonna of the Trail –    Website: https://www.nps.gov/nr/travel/route66/madonna_of_the_trail_albuquerque.html  – Located at: Intersection of Marble and Fourth Streets

Hours of operation: It’s a statue in an open space, 24 hours/day. Cost: $0

The Madonna of the Trail is a granite statue that was commissioned by the National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution.  Twelve of these statues were (identically) created and placed in the twelve states along the National Old Trails Road which runs from Cumberland Maryland to Upland California.

According to wiki: Created by sculptor August Leimbach and funded by contributions, the Madonna of the Trail monuments were intended to provide a symbol of the courage and faith of the women whose strength and love aided so greatly in conquering the wilderness and establishing permanent homes. Dedicated in 1928 and 1929, the twelve statues became sources of local pride. Through the continuing efforts of local and national groups, all are currently in good condition and on display.

Time allotted for this stop: 15 minutes – photo op

My thoughts:

My pictures from Madonna of the Trail:

As a side note, please watch for my blog of random photographs for this area.  I forgot my camera cable and I have tons of photos to share once I am able.  Once posted, I will put the link to the pictures here.

 

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